Charging in Jerevan, Armenia

Nici left early on Sunday morning after a fun evening with open-air cinema, film discussion and some drinks at Fabrica, a great place in Tbilisi. Benedikt and I charged the car one more time at the 22kW charging station in the city center of Tbilisi. The interest in the Tesla was very high this time. During the 20 minutes of charging the car, we were constantly surrounded by some men. If they weren’t looking at the different details of the car, they tried to buy our city scooter. We have two of those scooters with us. We want to use them for a fast and independent transportation in cities or during charging stops. So far, we didn’t use them a whole lot, because either the weather was too bad or the street quality too low. But this will change eventually, we believe 😉.

 

We escaped the crowed and left for the border between Georgia and Armenia. There was no line in front of the border, which was already a good sign. All in all, the border was easy. The only thing that took longer was to register the car to enter Armenia. We first didn’t know that we had to do this and as soon as we found out, the Swiss car documents (in German, French, Italian and Rhaeto-Romanic) didn’t make the filling out of the documents much faster.

What surprised us after the border crossing, were really bad maintained roads. The number of deep put-holes was extremely high. During the first third of the trip, from the border till Yerevan, our average speed was between 10 and 50 km/h. Luckily the road got better and better the closer we got to Yerevan.

 

In Yerevan, we could charge the car at a Schuko in the garage of a small hotel close to the city center. We planned to stay for two nights in Yerevan. Therefor charging with only 2kW was ok. After about 24 hours the battery of the car was charged at 85% again. By chance we found a supermarket including a big Armenian food-court on our way out of the city. The supermarket had a underground garage with many three-phase outlets`! Our Turkish adapter, worked with the outlets (which is kind of ironic, considering the relationship between Armenia and Turkey). We were very happy about this finding and charged the car with 11kW while we were having lunch in the food-court.

Yerevan isn’t a particular beautiful city or old city, since a lot of soviet architecture dominates the cityscape. Nevertheless, Benedikt and I were both inspired by the friendly and laid-back culture of the city. Compared to Tbilisi, Yerevan is less touristic, less crowded and somehow maybe even (mainstream) hipper.

2 thoughts on “Charging in Jerevan, Armenia

  1. What a great trip! I lived in Russia 5 years, Azerbaijan 5 years, Kyrgyzstan 1 1/2 year2, Moldova 1 1/2 years and Ukraine for about a year.

    I have a Model S in California and must say I’m very impressed with your sense of adventure and demonstrating that one can travel electric in a region where most wouldn’t think it was possible. Makes my little charging adventures seem trivial.

    It really does serve as a guide for future travelers! Would be good to note which locations actually required wiring vs just plugging in.

    Sie sind herzlich willkommen in San Diego sollten Sie die Moeglichkeit haben, hierher zu kommen in der Zukunft.

    1. Thanks so much Derek! Actually, except of some very rare occasions where we found a local three phase socket, we always wired our way to electricity between Iran and Kazachstan. Three-phase outlets started in Russia again. We put all sockets that are public on plugshare.

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